On Den-Mark, Get Set… CO!penhagen!

For our four-night/three-day, visit to Denmark, we decided to stay in the city centre of Copenhagen. Our airbnb was a room in a small apartment shared with the owner, however, he was away for work during our stay, so we ended up having the whole place to ourselves. It was a real blessing to have a kitchen because Denmark is very expensive …so we cooked every meal.

DSC_4945DSC_4945_1200Copenhagen provided us with consistent sunny and windless days of 20 degrees -which we decided was the perfect temperature for walking around outside all day. Walk we did… although if I were more confident on a bicycle, it would have been a perfect city to ride around too. There were more cyclists than vehicles. Even though this had also been the case in our previously visited countries; Austria, Belgium and of course the Netherlands, Copenhagen cyclists followed the road rules to the T! The cycle lanes operated in the same direction as the traffic but were wider and better maintained than the vehicle lanes. They had separate traffic lights and signs, and when a cyclist wanted to cross over to the other side they dismounted and walked with the pedestrians. As a result, there were never cyclists zooming between us as we walked and best of all we hardly ever heard that annoying dinging sound from their bikes.

We woke up early for our first day in Copenhagen. After breakfast we started our walk over Queen Louise Bridge (only 200m from our apartment) and enjoyed the serenity of the lakes. We then continued towards the city centre, wandering through some markets on the way…

We paid a small entry fee to visit Rundetaarn, ‘The Round Tower.’ A 17th Century tower with a 281m spiralling ramp which loops around the hollow core of the tower 7.3times. It was a rather dizzying experience, but the hardest part was the climb to the viewing platform at the end through a very narrow spiral staircase which was servicing both visitors going up and down. The views over the city at the top quickly made us forget the cramped, slow and uncomfortable staircase. We were also able to use the birds-eye view to plan our next places to visit…

Next, we walked across to the beautiful gardens at Rosenborg Palace. Here we sat and admired the gardens from a park bench and enjoyed the sunshine. When we continued our walk through the gardens towards the palace, we realised we timed it to see the beginning of the change of guard dance. We watched for a while and then lost interest and instead wandered through the palace rose gardens…

Almost time for lunch, so we took a detour through the botanical gardens on our way back to our apartment. It was a very nice garden with a large glasshouse (extra fee to enter) we had a short walk through the gardens but were surprised to see kiwifruit growing along a fence…

Later in the afternoon, we walked over to the Kasellet fortress. It was constructed in the 1600s and is in the shape of a star. It’s hard to miss on google maps and would be a great place if you had a drone. Since we visited later in the day there weren’t as many people around…

Just outside the fortress, we walked along the harbour and soon came across a bronze statue of Hans Christian Anderson’s ‘Little Mermaid.’ It’s amazing how little monuments can become such a draw card for tourists …there were heaps of people there getting their quick snap – us included…

But further along the harbour we came across much more impressive statues and buildings. As the sun dropped below the buildings, we were provided with excellent lighting for photographs too…

The next day we headed back into the city again, this time we found ourselves passing through Christianborg Palace…

Our next stop was at Nyhavn canal. This was once home to the famous writer, Hans Christian Anderson and nowadays the scene on most of the postcards. It was a super busy tourist stop…

Right next to the Nyhavn canal, there’s a pedestrian/cyclist bridge and as soon as we had crossed it the crowds melted away and we found ourselves walking along a gentrified area. Many people were sunbathing and taking quick dips in the chilly canal water. There were a heap of little cafes and apartments in the renovated industrial buildings along the waterfront. It was a nice place to stroll along…

A few streets back we were drawn in by the spiralling steeple of the Church of Our Saviour. When we got closer, we could see the large line to go up the tower and decided against the climb. However, we did go inside and were impressed with the grand organ inside…

What a contrast it was when we came across ‘Freetown Christiana’ a couple of blocks away. Apparently in the 1970’s a group of squatters moved into a deserted military barracks and from there the area spiralled into an autonomous community. The residents have many stalls set up to create an income. The houses and streets are covered in artwork …it provided an interesting walk…

In the evening we visited Tivoli. This is the world’s second oldest amusement park, and is most famously known for inspiring young Walt Disney. We didn’t pay to go on any of the rides, which were more pitched towards families with young children …of which there were many! It was a very crowded and overwhelming place – we didn’t last too long. There was a ballet performance which we watched for a while and a few interactive games. We stayed long enough to see the night lights begin to twinkle…

On our last day we decided to watch the Lion King. It turns out that Imperial Theatre, Copenhagen, is the home of Northern Europe’s largest single screen with 1002 seats. The film had only been out for a couple of days so we were pretty surprised when there was only about 20 people in the theatre. The seats were very comfortable and were able to recline back. Of course, we already knew the storyline of the film but we were both very impressed with the cinematography. An added bonus was this time we had Danish subtitles…

 

Have fun at work!

Gemma

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